Teaching Writing (GC)

This certificate enables current and prospective teachers (Grade 5-College) to develop expertise in teaching writing. Students will gain theoretical, practical, and experiential knowledge about the teaching of writing that will strengthen their confidence and understanding as writing teachers.

Entrance requirements for the Teaching Writing Graduate Certificate include official transcripts from the undergraduate degree-granting institution, a 5-page analytical writing sample with research, a personal statement describing relevant experience and professional goals, and the email addresses of two individuals who have agreed to write letters of recommendation.

Courses in the graduate certificate may double-count toward the Communication & Composition (C&C) master's degree. Completion of the master's qualifies the student to also earn a graduate certificate in Communication Education (Communication Studies). Students in C&C are highly encouraged to apply for graduation in all three credentials. 

Gainful Employement Program Information:
The program is a Gainful Employment program regulated by the U.S. Department of Education. The U.S. Department of Education requires additional information be provided to you about this certificate program. For more information follow these links:

Program Requirements

Common Core

ENG 555 is offered as variable credit, but in order to complete the certificate students must take 18 credits. Certificate students must take ENG 555 for at least 3 credits.

Advanced interdisciplinary writing emphasizes critical reading and thinking, argumentative writing, library research, and documentation of sources in an academic setting. Practice and study of selected rhetorics of inquiry employed in academic disciplines preparing students for different systems of writing.

Prerequisites: none

Introduction to the major theories of the nature of composition and their pedagogical application.

Prerequisites: none

This course will introduce methods of inquiry-based research for investigating writing practices and pedagogy; this research could be conducted in classrooms for the purpose of improving teaching practices, students' learning, and/or institutional curricular design and practices.

Prerequisites: none

Restricted Electives

Choose 9 Credit(s). Special topics courses are subject to approval based on the focus of the course when offered. Please note ENG 622 or ENG 623 may be taken, with the permission of the instructor, as a substitution for ENG 655. ENG 622 and 623 are only offered face-to-face.

Topics in Rhetoric and Composition will be a variable title course that explores special topics relating to the theory, history, and practice of one or more areas within rhetoric and composition.

Prerequisites: none

Advanced writing course emphasizing major contemporary public issues. Practice in and study of: the logic by which writers construct arguments; the various means that writers use to persuade an audience; the conventions of evidence, claims, and argument in persuasive discourses.

Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to familiarize students with current theories and practices of writing centers as well as to provide training in working with writers one-on-one. During the course, students will discuss best practices for teaching writing and examine the roles writing centers play in helping students negotiate the terrain of college literacy. The focus of the course will be to prepare students in the history of writing centers, to discuss the current scholarship and theory on best practices in writing centers, and to outline and provide interactive opportunities into the pedagogy of writing center tutoring.

Prerequisites: none

Introduction to theory and best practices of teaching second language grammar and vocabulary to a variety of English learners in multiple contexts - specifically focusing on content based teaching practices.

Prerequisites: none

Introduction to theory and best practices of teaching second language reading and writing to a variety of English learners in multiple contexts.

Prerequisites: none

Exploration of second language literacy as a situated social practice. Current second language literacy theories and practices are studied and applied to a variety of second language reading and writing instructional contexts.

Prerequisites: none

Topics relating to creative writing. May be repeated with different subject matter.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines the teaching of literature across collegiate levels and is designed for English graduate students. It is both practical and theoretical, examining topics such as: the purposes for teaching literature and teaching critical thinking; pedagogical approaches for teaching literature; and designing syllabi, lesson plans, and assignments. We will explore these topics through a variety of texts and perspectives. Assignments will include creating syllabi and lesson plans, reviewing scholarship on a particular topic related to the teaching of literature, and a conference paper on some aspect of the teaching of literature.

Prerequisites: none

This course will examine current instructional practices used to teach writing in academic settings. The grade-level focus of the course (middle/high school, or college) will change each time it is offered.

Prerequisites: none

This course will explore the theoretical and practical implications of integrating literature into the composition classroom.

Prerequisites: none

Argumentation is the study of how people justify their acts, beliefs, attitudes, and values, and influence the thought and actions of others, by providing good reasons for the claims they make. This subfield includes both descriptive study (what do people consider to be good reasons and what are they doing when they offer what they take to be justifications?) and normative investigation (under what circumstances should claims be considered justified?). This course addresses argumentation in general and argumentation in specific contexts such as law, business, science, religion, and public affairs, as well as the teaching of argumentation.

Prerequisites: none

Examination of instructional design principles and models, including research in theory and practice of instructional design for technical communicators in academic and industry settings.

Prerequisites: none