Technical Communication (GC)

The graduate certificate program prepares participants for careers in technical communication, emphasizing current industry practice in the research, writing, editing, and publishing of (print or online ) technical documents. Required coursework emphasizes the development of student skills in audience analysis, problem solving, and collaboration within the workplace as well as the production of text and graphics for print and online publication. Special topics courses focus on industry practice in standards and documentation, document design, web development, usability testing, international communication, or other topics of importance to technical communicators. Although 500-level courses in the graduate certificate focus on skill development and industry practice, they also explore theory and research supporting industry practice. Admission Requirements Entrance requirements for the Graduate Certificate in Technical Communication include a BA or BS degree and Technical Communication (ENG 271), Business Communication (ENG 272), or equivalent technical communication experience. The GRE is not required as part of the admissions material for this program. Candidates whose native language is not English must have a TOEFL score of 550 or above.

Gainful Employement Program Information:
The program is a Gainful Employment program regulated by the U.S. Department of Education. The U.S. Department of Education requires additional information be provided to you about this certificate program. For more information follow these links:

Program Requirements

Common Core

Analysis and training focused on concepts and practices of visual design as they relate to technical and professional communication.

Prerequisites: none

Editing the content, organization, format, style, and mechanics of documents; managing the production cycle of documents, and discovering and learning microcomputer and software applications for technical editing tasks.

Prerequisites: none

This course addresses the planning and execution of content through methodological approaches to data analysis and content development. This course surveys the planning, creation, and management of content within editorial development, experience design, and systems design. Students will explore the methods of content strategy to compile, extract, and develop meaningful content that uses multimodal tools for visualization.

Prerequisites: none

Restricted Electives

Choose 9 Credit(s).

Introduces students to theories of usability and teaches students various methods to evaluate design for usability including heuristic evaluations, card-sorting, task-based evaluations, and fieldwork.

Prerequisites: none

Students learn how to research and write technical information for multiple cultures, both locally and internationally.

Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to introduce students to technical project management. This introduction is achieved through participation in a simulated project management experience. Assignments include standard documentation associated with project management and reflective writing.

Prerequisites: none

Topics in theory and practice of technical communication. Hands-on course which implements the theories discussed. May be repeated with different subject matter.

Prerequisites: none

Overview of publishing and typography, conventions of desktop publishing, and hardware and software application tools for desktop publishing. Students need not have prior experience with DTP, but some word processing and microcomputer experience will be helpful. Course will meet in both PC and Macintosh labs.

Prerequisites: none

Creating both on-line and hard copy documentation for products, with emphasis on computer software and hardware documentation for users. Attention also to policies and procedures as written for a range of uses, e.g. employee handbooks, manufacturing processes, and usability testing.

Prerequisites: none

This course addresses the skills required for technical communication within the context of health and medicine. Students will discuss typical audiences, purposes, and genres of health and medical communication. Students will adapt complex health and medical information for audiences with varying levels of knowledge, demonstrating awareness of audience analysis, visual design, plain language, and ethics.

Prerequisites: none

The course addresses the use of research to answer questions and solve problems in the technical communication workplace. The course addresses research methods commonly used by technical communicators, such as interviewing, surveys, usability testing, and secondary research.

Prerequisites: none

Topics relating to rhetorical theory in the workplace, including examination of how workplace cultures shape writing assumptions and approaches. May be repeated with different subject matter.

Prerequisites: none

Examination of instructional design principles and models, including research in theory and practice of instructional design for technical communicators in academic and industry settings.

Prerequisites: none

Theory and practice in the development and production of proposals, focusing on the researching, writing, and management of proposals by technical communicators.

Prerequisites: none

User experience is a more holistic, contextualized approach to understanding an individuals encounter with technologies, systems, and documents. The course addresses theory, research findings, case studies, and methods for conducting user experience research.

Prerequisites: none